Category Archives: Interviews

Daniel Avery

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A perfectionist finding himself on an unlikely career path, Daniel Avery doesn’t classify as your average dj. Drone Logic was one of the best records released in 2013 and will undoubtedly change how people think about techno.

Unlike many djs and electronic producers who spend their formative years daydreaming of playing shows in Ibiza, scoring a residency at Fabric or topping Beatport charts, Avery “had zero idea” he wanted to be a dj.” As a teenager he “wanted to be in a band and even then, it was just a weird dream… it wasn’t a likelihood.” But what exactly is the likelihood of going onto becoming an internationally acclaimed dj and producer, by responding to an advertisement in a record store for a warm up dj? “I’m not making fun when I say this [but] I had zero idea I wanted to be a dj. I just thought it would be kind of cool to try when I saw the advert.”

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An unremarkable start for some, Avery was quickly enamoured by his first experience and says “the second I started doing it, it felt like sharing music on a larger scale… I saw the reaction that people were having [to the music] and it’s an amazing feeling.” Speaking with Avery, I got the sense that sharing music was about more than just updating his Spotify playlists or linking a cool track to a pretentious Facebook group, and unsurprisingly it all started at home. “My parents have quite regular jobs but my dad is obsessive about music [and] still now, he’ll be telling me what music he’s listening to.”

Drone Logic is a peak into Avery’s teenage years, with “elements that I love from certain styles of guitar music, like shoe gaze or psych rock” seamlessly woven into the album. Hardly a mash-up of the two, Avery insists that “it’s still very much a techno album” and his intentions were never to make a record that was “rock meets rave in any way“. Humbly accepting my glowing praise, Avery beams, “I just made an album that sounds like me, I think and I’m pleased in that respect. I think it represents a few different sides of my brain and it’s definitely a record for the club.” It isn’t your average club album though, and this pull away from dance music cliches was influenced heavily by his favourite djs, who “don’t come from the centre or mainstream of dance music, they’re kind of the outsiders.” Andrew Weatherall, Optimo, Michael Mayer and Erol Alkan are all of major significance in Avery’s dance music career but he was really “inspired from an early age by people who take an alternative approach to dance music and  I wanted to put my stamp on that idea.”

Undoubtedly Erol Alkan is paramount to and a pioneer of indie dance music, releasing remixes of Tame Impala, MGMT, Metronomy, Eurhythmics, Hot Chip and countless others alongside uplifting house tracks like A Hold On Love. Taking Daniel under his wing after meeting each other in London, Alkan signed him to Phantasy. “One of the best things about Erol is his pace, I trust his pace and how he does things, he does things properly.” Becoming good friends over the years “it feels really natural to be on Phantasy” and Avery is in good company. “Phantasy is much more than a dance label, it also puts out acts like Babe Terror, BTU, Connan Mockasin… but everything has a psychedelic edge to it and that comes from Erol’s tastes.” His fascination with dance music beginning with Erol Alkan at Trash, Avery still finds as much time as he can to admire the work of other djs especially “at a time now where I really still love going to nightclubs. Whenever I go and dj somewhere, I try and spend a few hours in the club listening to people play. I’m interested in all types of dance music and anything that can have an effect on people.

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Daniel Avery’s fascination with people’s reactions to music is fascinating in itself, especially in the ‘everyone’s a dj’ world we live in, the excitement he brings to his sets is admirable. Repeating a number of times how it is the “reactions” of people and seeing “how it affects the moods of people” that allures him , he beams “it’s beyond surreal [and] an incredible feeling to put on a record that you believe in and see everyone react to it.”

Rather than adopting a facade of nonchalance, Avery wants to “show that  I know what I want.” The electronic music scene is filled with a “throng of djs” and producers where everyone is trying to make a name for themselves but in a moment, letting his guard down Avery admits, “I am a perfectionist… and the last thing I want is to kind of fade away like everyone else.”  Maybe it’s nervousness, self deprecation or realism, but critics will be waiting for his second LP, which will be dubbed his ‘much anticipated second release’, I’m sure. “I’ve got this idea in my head that the next record’s going to be, not one long piece but I have this idea of it being a continuous trip. The reaction to the record has been so great, right across the board and its given me a lot of confidence to push things further.”

It will be interesting to see if Avery’s career will take him to places which will cement his mark in dance music or if he himself has prophesized his own unremarkable fade into dj mediocrity. Although, someone with so much passion and humility should go as far as they want to.

Jimmy Edgar’s Future Roots Sound Like Techno Evolution

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As a hot commodity at this year’s Miami Music, we simply had to chat with American producer Jimmy Edgar. Appearing all across the board, Edgar’s originals and remixes are positioned for a takeover. With what sounds like a perfect recipe, Jimmy’s influences while growing up in Detroit and getting comfy in Berlin, produce a unique style of electronic infused art.

Taking the fashionista approach, Edgar and Ultramajic are paving the way by setting trends with self-described ‘forbidden’ releases. Including a healthy chunk of techno, their vibe is for the refined dance enthusiast. Right up our alley for well-rounded club tunes, we are looking for more from this producer who seems to be in all the right places. With originals on Hotflush, !K7, and Warp as well as remixes on Bromance, Boysnoize, and Visionquest, he has proven to be running in the right circles. Support on all sides leads to interesting gigs including this years synth-inspired Moogfest.

In anticipation of an ongoing rise to the top, we were lucky to ask a few questions about Jimmy, Ultramajic, and his roots.

Ultramajic. Seems to be more than just a label. How would you describe WHAT IS ULTRAMAJIC? Ultramajic is, at its foundation, a record label.  We have a very specific integrity that we put into all of what we do, its been a sort of joke but its stuck with it; everything has to have a bit of fun, magic, fashion and mystique. We like the art to feel like you are looking at something lost, forbidden or secret… but we never loose the fun aspect of it, and we all have different disciplines from fashion.  Currently, Pilar Zeta (our graphic designer), does all the visuals for Holographic Universe FW14/15, a new fashion label.

So you started releasing under Ultramajic last summer, now here we are with a dope Miami showcase under your belt. What are the steps that led to this rise? It really just happened from nowhere, the label has been successful and it just made sense to get a bunch of friends together while we were all in Miami.  When you combined focus and integrity with passion for art, I think amazing things can happen.  If you try and fake it then it doesn’t ever work, so with these ideas we all have to agree that its something we would be impressed with ourselves.  We now have upcoming nights at Fabric in London, Social Club in Paris and several more.  We plan on doing something very special for Art Basel in Miami.

You just made the jump from Berlin to LA. What prompted the move to head back stateside for a home base? We have opened an office/studio in LA, but its so very fresh that its not fair to comment on it, we just decided to make a drastic change and see how it functions with the people we work with.  We still have heavy ties in Berlin and I have kept a studio there, with all the traveling it doesn’t feel like we have moved because we are always moving.  The move to LA is more about lifestyle changes around the music, different selection of food, options to exercise, weather… we still work so much from home that we need a great environment, for me having a garden and place to meditate means we can create more brilliant/bright work.

“We like the art to feel like you are looking at something lost, forbidden or secret… but we never loose the fun aspect of it..”

 

 

 

 

 The trending sound right now seems to be influenced by a perfect blend of techno and disco. Where are you influences and what artist contributed to make dance music what it is today? The influences are the same as they have always been for my music.  RnB, Chicago House, Detroit Techno, Boogie/Funk, and more recently I discovered what Berlin Techno was all about.  Before I lived in europe I didn’t know much about Berlin techno, I think you really have to spend time in the clubs to understand it.  So, we have managed to combined the patience and sound of Berlin techno, with the arrangement of american/Chi/detroit electronic music to find some mid ground that works at big parties.  We all come from underground music background, but both Travis (Machinedrum) and I have played massive stages all over the world so we create music for this, were inspired by mass amounts of people and there is nothing worse than dropping a track that is too weak for the amount of people there to see you.

Give us some insight into the future. What off-the-wall trend will we hear in dance music songs ten years from now? Polka Gabbers? I love the rehash of 90s pop music in new electronic music.  Its suddenly feeling cool to work with major chords.  One of our artists, SOPHIE, is doing some amazing stuff.  We really have some cool stuff planned, we are expanding our palette.  We always planned on establishing ourselves as a dope dance single label and then moving on to expand the sound.  So, with that, this year will reveal several new artists we are developing!

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A unique blend of techno roots and European innovation, Jimmy has a style like no other. Holding an ear for mystical dance, his label Ultramajic has a bright future ahead. His tunes reflect a misinterpreted style crafted like no other. Jimmy’s club prowess integrates industrial groove with funky drive. We can’t wait to hear what direction he heads next.

As a Detroit local and frequenter of the Chicago area, the late Frankie Knuckles had a huge influence on the house theory the led to Jimmy’s style today. Surrounding Frankie’s late passing, Jimmy reminisced of the early dates dropping in Chi-town’s iconic spots. Giving an rinse to the man himself, Jimmy recently dropped a rework of ‘Baby Wants A Ride’. Get the tune while it’s up for grabs below.

the interview show: Kim Churchill 2013

Kim Churchill is an indie folk, rock and blues singer, songwriter and musician from Australia. He’s developing a sizeable fan following in Canada. A fan myself, it’s been great to watch his progress, from busking to playing a bigger club with each visit.

I chatted with Kim Churchill last time he was in town. In the interview, he tells me about the deal he made with his dad to take classic guitar lessons and why his entourage eats so many oranges (among other things). Listen to our chat!

the interview show with Kim Churchill

Kim Churchill “Season’s Grind” This is Kim‘s most “rawk” track off his 2012 record Detail of Distance. He tells me in the interview how his time here in Canada influenced this song.

Kim Churchill “Sarah” This song is about Kim‘s sister. Listen to the interview to hear the whole story.

Kim Churchill will be back in Vancouver this Wednesday at the Biltmore. He’s just released a new record, Silence/Win. See you there!

Posted by @interview_show
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www.cjsf.ca (Vancouver, BC, Mondays 4:30-5pm PST and Wednesdays 12:30am PST)
www.ckdu.ca (Halifax, NS, Fridays 12:00-12:30am AST)
www.radiocfxu.ca (Campus Community Radio, Antigonish, NS, Fridays 11pm-12am AST)
www.cfru.ca (University of Guelph Radio, ON, Tuesdays 3pm EST)
www.umfm.com (Winnipeg’s Hit Free Radio, Fridays 6-6:30pm CST)
www.caperradio.com (Cape Breton University Radio, NS, Wednesdays 3-3:30pm AST)
www.localfm.ca (Campus Radio Saint John Inc., NB, Tuesdays 11:30am and Fridays 3:30pm AST)

Kulkid Talks French House and new tunes

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After a variety of remix work, French producer Kulkid has shared his debut EP and it’s a groove to be had. Defining a sound in the Parisian scene is no easy task. Citing influences of Laurent Garnier and Brodinski, his fresh take on house is welcome in our sets. Building dance floor ready vocals in a pumping 2 part release, Forget about Kul/ I need u is a must add for shaking it up behind the decks.

Proving that the French house revolution has much more to come, techno-heavy dance is making European love nest a breeding ground for electric trends. As up and comers like Kulkid spread their wings, we can expect the hot to get hotter. We chatted with Kulkid about the local flavor. With loads of tunes on the way, are keeping our ear on this one.

With your debut EP about the release, shed some like on ‘Where did Kulkid come from?’ As a French producer what influences have driven you to today?

I grew up in the French Alps constantly listening to music. My mom used to play a lot of classical music, my dad being more into the progressive rock end of things. I played the guitar, cello and keys in several bands when I was younger. Having a background playing these instruments has role in how I create the ambiance within a record and the way I approach melodies. I would consider this to be the influencing factor in most, if not all of my productions, although my musical palette is quite diverse as I listen to everything from Latin music to jazz and everything in between.

Define modern day French House.

The French scene is really really diverse. There’s a bunch of different genres, and sub genres, that are paving the way for French producers. There is a strong following for the techno scene with artists like Brodinski, Gesaffelstein, Laurent Garnier, and Agoria at the forefront paving the way for younger producers such as myself… On the other hand, a following has recently developed for artists that put a stronger focus on melodies as opposed to pure rhythm. Some artists off the top of my head are Para One, FKJ, Yuksek, and more.

This 2 track release boasts a healthy chunk of soul. What drew you to the vocal tracks in these tunes?

I searched pretty thoroughly through a library of old school tunes and acappellas as old school house and soulful vocals are infectious. When I heard these acapellas I instantly fell in love. The two vocals I used are different in many ways. “Forgot About Kul” is a more “modern” vocal with a low pitch and “I Need U” has a more old school feel to it.

French House/ Techno has changed in recent years with the spotlight moving from the Ed Banger solo days to the likes of the Bromance Crew, Yuksek, and Sound Pellegrino. Do you think there is any method to these trends or just a ton of nation talent succeeding in a sound that feels right?

The scene in France is a lot smaller in many ways than one might think. France is a country with a strong electronic background and is very open to the many different genres and sub genres. Producers always help each other, bouncing ideas off one and other ultimately trying to grow as musicians. Building a collective or a team to collaborate among each other is what many producers do.

You can definitely feel the presence Ed Banger still has on the scene here in France. They are notorious for hosting dope parties all around Paris and work hand in hand with Red Bull Studios.

Your Bootleg and Remix day got you to the present. Do you think this practice was essential while developing your original sound? Was it a calculated strategy or just natural to lead up to this debut EP.

Remixing records was great in many different ways from building a strong and loyal following to really giving me the opportunity to work and develop my original sound throughout. It wasn’t essential, but I love remixing tunes and I also love composing my own music. I have multiple originals that I’m really excited about releasing. This EP is just the beginning.

The tracks are going out for free through your own channels (Thanks!). What made you choose this above working with a label for distribution?

It only feels right to host this EP for free as most of my releases to date have been free downloads. I find that a large part of the Kulkid brand revolves around the idea of releasing free music. I think finding a balance between releasing enough free content to give back to those who support you daily is just as important as a paid release. There’s many ways an artist can benefit from working with a record label. One can gain a ton of exposure if working with the right label but there are so many trade offs. I’m sure I will work with a label in the near future although I’m in no rush and I’d really like to make sure it is the perfect family I’ll be joining that I can call home for the long haul. If the opportunity to build a collective presents itself I wouldn’t mind that either :)

What should we keep our ears out for over the next year? Now that you have originals hitting the deck, what are some musical goals for the near future?

There’s lots of great things on the go and I can’t wait to share for everyone to hear. Lots of originals, remixes and collaborations in queue. I don’t know if this will happen in the near future but the idea of building a live set with synths, guitars, drums, and several other instruments has definitely been on my mind for quite some time. I truly miss playing instruments.

 

Kulkid Talks French House and new tunes

_MG_2008

After a variety of remix work, French producer Kulkid has shared his debut EP and it’s a groove to be had. Defining a sound in the Parisian scene is no easy task. Citing influences of Laurent Garnier and Brodinski, his fresh take on house is welcome in our sets. Building dance floor ready vocals in a pumping 2 part release, Forget about Kul/ I need u is a must add for shaking it up behind the decks.

Proving that the French house revolution has much more to come, techno-heavy dance is making European love nest a breeding ground for electric trends. As up and comers like Kulkid spread their wings, we can expect the hot to get hotter. We chatted with Kulkid about the local flavor. With loads of tunes on the way, are keeping our ear on this one.

With your debut EP about the release, shed some like on ‘Where did Kulkid come from?’ As a French producer what influences have driven you to today?

I grew up in the French Alps constantly listening to music. My mom used to play a lot of classical music, my dad being more into the progressive rock end of things. I played the guitar, cello and keys in several bands when I was younger. Having a background playing these instruments has role in how I create the ambiance within a record and the way I approach melodies. I would consider this to be the influencing factor in most, if not all of my productions, although my musical palette is quite diverse as I listen to everything from Latin music to jazz and everything in between.

Define modern day French House.

The French scene is really really diverse. There’s a bunch of different genres, and sub genres, that are paving the way for French producers. There is a strong following for the techno scene with artists like Brodinski, Gesaffelstein, Laurent Garnier, and Agoria at the forefront paving the way for younger producers such as myself… On the other hand, a following has recently developed for artists that put a stronger focus on melodies as opposed to pure rhythm. Some artists off the top of my head are Para One, FKJ, Yuksek, and more.

This 2 track release boasts a healthy chunk of soul. What drew you to the vocal tracks in these tunes?

I searched pretty thoroughly through a library of old school tunes and acappellas as old school house and soulful vocals are infectious. When I heard these acapellas I instantly fell in love. The two vocals I used are different in many ways. “Forgot About Kul” is a more “modern” vocal with a low pitch and “I Need U” has a more old school feel to it.

French House/ Techno has changed in recent years with the spotlight moving from the Ed Banger solo days to the likes of the Bromance Crew, Yuksek, and Sound Pellegrino. Do you think there is any method to these trends or just a ton of nation talent succeeding in a sound that feels right?

The scene in France is a lot smaller in many ways than one might think. France is a country with a strong electronic background and is very open to the many different genres and sub genres. Producers always help each other, bouncing ideas off one and other ultimately trying to grow as musicians. Building a collective or a team to collaborate among each other is what many producers do.

You can definitely feel the presence Ed Banger still has on the scene here in France. They are notorious for hosting dope parties all around Paris and work hand in hand with Red Bull Studios.

Your Bootleg and Remix day got you to the present. Do you think this practice was essential while developing your original sound? Was it a calculated strategy or just natural to lead up to this debut EP.

Remixing records was great in many different ways from building a strong and loyal following to really giving me the opportunity to work and develop my original sound throughout. It wasn’t essential, but I love remixing tunes and I also love composing my own music. I have multiple originals that I’m really excited about releasing. This EP is just the beginning.

The tracks are going out for free through your own channels (Thanks!). What made you choose this above working with a label for distribution?

It only feels right to host this EP for free as most of my releases to date have been free downloads. I find that a large part of the Kulkid brand revolves around the idea of releasing free music. I think finding a balance between releasing enough free content to give back to those who support you daily is just as important as a paid release. There’s many ways an artist can benefit from working with a record label. One can gain a ton of exposure if working with the right label but there are so many trade offs. I’m sure I will work with a label in the near future although I’m in no rush and I’d really like to make sure it is the perfect family I’ll be joining that I can call home for the long haul. If the opportunity to build a collective presents itself I wouldn’t mind that either :)

What should we keep our ears out for over the next year? Now that you have originals hitting the deck, what are some musical goals for the near future?

There’s lots of great things on the go and I can’t wait to share for everyone to hear. Lots of originals, remixes and collaborations in queue. I don’t know if this will happen in the near future but the idea of building a live set with synths, guitars, drums, and several other instruments has definitely been on my mind for quite some time. I truly miss playing instruments.

 

Forgot About Kul

I Need U

[GDD EXCLUSIVE] INTERVIEW w/ EATS EVERYTHING + FREE DOWNLOAD!

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Justin Martin invades Exchange LA this Saturday for the second round of his residency and this time he brings the UK dirtybird Eats Everything with him for a special 8 hour b2b set! To get you ready for the long haul, we caught up with Eats about WMC and playing with Justin. We also got an exclusive ‘Reebeef’ of his for free download, so read what he had to say and grab the tune below!

Eats’ interview + exclusive download (after the jump)

GDD: We all survived another WMC! How was your week in Miami and what made this one special? Dirtybird BBQ? Paradise?

EE: My week was barely a day really!! I landed at 11pm Wednesday, had dinner with Justin & Barclay. Slept for 4hrs. Woke. Had breakfast, then went to the BBQ. Drank extensively till my set at 1am. DJ’d. Went to paradise. DJ’d. Stayed there till midday watching others DJ. Went to hotel, packed bag, went to airport. Denied upgrade. Died on the plane. It was a lovely time!!!

GDD: You and Justin finally have collaborated on another EP! We’ve been hearing “Steven Jello” in your sets for months, and “Kong” definitely leans to your beefy productions. What was the motive behind this EP?

EE: The motive was as it always is fun with a twist on what we each do. We always try and make what we consider to be forward thinking music whether it’s individually or collaboratively. Hopefully we get it right :)

GDD: Speaking of the Justin collab, what are these rumors we hear of a full length album together? Could it be true?

EE: We were planning to do one, then we ran out of time. We both still definitely want to do one together but having the touring schedules we have but living 13hrs apart and a 9hr time difference it is difficult.

GDD: You and Justin play an 8 hour back-to-back set this Saturday @ Exchange LA. Are you guys gonna have special guests or just be powering through like a full-time job?

EE: We are just going to be powering through. I play a lot of 5hr plus sets and it’s the most fun as you can play all sorts of shit. It’s gonna be a lot of fun as Justin is my fave person to play with.

GDD: What is it about Justin that makes it seem so easy for you guys to play together? Do you feed off the energy of each other’s selections?

EE: We just have a lot of fun together. That’s basically it. We are a pair of idiots who have very similar taste in music luckily.

GDD:  8 hours is a pretty serious shift. What’s the longest set you’ve had and where was it?

EE: I have played a lot of 7/8hr sets in the last year. The longest I played was 11hrs at Sands in Ibiza a couple of years back. It was mega!!!

GDD: Is it going to be interesting playing right when the doors open? I’m sure it’s been a while since you opened up a club night…

EE: As I said, I have played a lot of all night long sets in the past year so this is nothing new to me. It’s great fun!!

GDD: Finally, besides adding a lot more tunes onto the USBs, do you approach an extended B2B set like this differently than you would other sets?

EE: You have to go into it with the mindset of it being a marathon not a sprint. The crowd have to bear that in mind also as it isn’t going to be bangers right from the get go. We will go right across the board genre and tempo wise and it’s gonna be a fun little journey :)

Don’t miss Justin Martin & Eats Everything this Saturday @ Exchange LA!
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the interview show: The Darcys

No one can deny that Toronto’s favourite indie rockers The Darcys are ambitious. Back when they announced their debut record on Canada’s legendary Arts & Crafts record label, they also declared the record would be the first in a trilogy. You have to admire that.

Their latest record Warring is the final part of this trilogy and the culmination of their work so far. Jason and Wes from the band were happy to sit down and talk openly about the band’s wild and rocky career. I start the interview with a cheesy, icebreaker type question. The reaction from these serious but ultra-charming fellows is hilarious and our chat only gets more amusing from there. Listen!

the interview show with The Darcys

The Darcys “The River” My favourite song off their latest record. The band picked this challenging track to be their first radio single off Warring. Why? Listen to our chat!

The Darcys “Lost Dogfights” The band also tells me why this song has a special place in their hearts.

The Darcys return to Vancouver (with Reuben and the Dark) at the Biltmore Cabaret on April 5, 2014 (Friday). See you there!

Posted by @interview_show
 is everywhere!
www.cjsf.ca (Vancouver, BC, Mondays 4:30-5pm PST and Wednesdays 12:30am PST)
www.ckdu.ca (Halifax, NS, Saturdays 1:30-2:00am AST)
www.radiocfxu.ca (Campus Community Radio, Antigonish, NS, Fridays 11pm-12am AST)
www.cfru.ca (University of Guelph Radio, ON, Tuesdays 3pm EST)
www.umfm.com (Winnipeg’s Hit Free Radio, Fridays 6-6:30pm CST)
www.caperradio.com (Cape Breton University Radio, NS, Wednesdays 3-3:30pm AST)
www.localfm.ca (Campus Radio Saint John Inc., NB, Tuesdays 11:30am and Fridays 3:30pm AST)

Tracking: My Favorite Robot

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Ahead of their sophomore showcase of live house music, we caught up with Canadian trio My Favorite Robot. Fresh out of Miami’s WMC crazy week, the deep producers are heading to Output introducing the live experience to Brooklyn. As accomplished producers, dj, and label heads the three have caught the global ear after a string of releases on favorite labels such as Visionquest, Life and Death, Hypercolour, and No. 19 music. As Canadian homies of No. 19 bosses Art Department, the MFR crew is often seen sharing the stage at sought-after showcases such as BPM Festival.

If that isn’t good enough their label My Favorite Robot Records is trucking along at full speed. Boasting a fun blend a club-ready house and techno, the releases never cease to amaze. A deep roster of friends both new an old hold a discography that seems perfect fit for the sound of tomorrow.

We talked to the guys about Miami, Brooklyn, and how packed their label’s release schedule is. With some much more to come, these are three that you need to keep on you track list.

As dance comes of age in the states are you seeing a gig shift, able to spend more time over here close to home?

My Favorite Robot: Yeah definitely! We have been spending a lot more time stateside, which has been great to be able to tour closer to home. It’s been amazing to see the band and label’s exposure continue to grow in the American market.

You recently debuted your live set at BPM this year, how does it feel to push out a project and have the opportunity preform some of the tracks you have been playing for years live?

My Favorite Robot: It’s a great feeling to perform our material in a full live format. The different dynamic offers a new set of challenges which helps keep things exciting for us. To be able to perform material that we have written over the last few years is a really great feeling, and we feel it offers a different type of experience and enjoyment for the audience.

Just back from Miami week, WMC week has been a long-time spot to debut to the global movers and shakers. Do you think the conference still holds it’s relevance?

My Favorite Robot: The conference has changed a lot over the years, but we feel it is still a great platform for us to expose our music and label with people from around the country. It of course has really grown with the rapid growth of the EDM scene, so though our music may not be the primary focus for most, its important for us to be showcasing our sound and vision to new potential fans. The EDM market is traditionally a bit of a younger scene, but we really were encouraged with the support and quality of shows that we were able to do over the week.

“Brooklyn as a whole really seems to suit electronic music right now, and we feel that our sound is totally at home there.”

 

 

 

 

The next round of the live show is at Output Brooklyn. This spot seems to come with NYC’s techno revival. How do you feel about the Bushwick kids riding to deep house?

My Favorite Robot: Output has been a great place to go and play. Brooklyn as a whole really seems to suit electronic music right now, and we feel that our sound is totally at home there. It’s encouraging to feel and see that growth in one America’s key music markets, and gives us a lot of faith that the growth of electronic music in the States is going to be something we can be a part of and benefit from.

What is the most challenging part about running the label and keeping the release pipeline full?

My Favorite Robot: Luckily because of the visibility and overall support we’ve gained with the label over the last 5 years, we have found it actually very easy to keep the pipeline full, and are consistently 6+ months ahead with music ready to release. We’ve tried to slow down a bit our release schedule a couple times in the last few months, but with so much amazing music coming our way, we feel it better to continue with our 2 release a month output and keep putting quality stuff out there for the listeners.

After your No.19 release last Fall you beefed up the life show, what’s next? Studio? Road?

My Favorite Robot: We have already been back in the studio, and our schedule is filling up at a nice healthy rate, so this year will be much of the same, spreading the robot gospel around the world through shows and label showcases.

They guys have a bright future for a project that came so naturally. Gearing up to head across the pond, MFR knows they will be right at home with the techno crew. Starting the summer strong at Barcelona’s Sonar Fest, we can’t wait to catch MFR set’s all summer long. For the NYC homies, be sure to check MFR with Eats Everything on April 4th.

Photo Credit: Pearcy Proper for TheBPMFestival.com

the interview show: Yppah

It seems like the Long Beach Ninja Tune electronic artist Yppah (sometimes known as Joe Corrales, Jr.) has become a constant touring partner of fellow NY Ninja Tune labelmate and hip hop producer Blockhead.  A few years ago while on tour with Blockhead, Yppah met musician, artivist and vocalist Anomie Bell. Strangely Yppah and Bell clicked and together they’ve made some of Yppah‘s most interesting tracks.

I chatted with Yppah (yeah, it’s “happy” backwards, but pronounced “Yip-Ah”) inside his tour van on a very rainy day and I get this very shy guy to spill his guts! Listen to our chat.

the interview show with Yppah

Yppah “D. Song” feat. Anomie Belle Yppah mixes melancholic electronica, breakbeat drum samples with shoegazer melodies set in an atmospheric sound landscape and Anomie Bell‘s voice takes everything to the next level.

Yppah “Soon Enough” feat. Anomie Belle

Blockhead and Yppah are back in Vancouver tomorrow, Thursday April 3, 2014, at Venue Nightclub. See you there!

Posted by @interview_show
 is everywhere!
www.cjsf.ca (Vancouver, BC, Mondays 4:30-5pm PST and Wednesdays 12:30am PST)
www.ckdu.ca (Halifax, NS, Saturdays 1:30-2:00am AST)
www.radiocfxu.ca (Campus Community Radio, Antigonish, NS, Fridays 11pm-12am AST)
www.cfru.ca (University of Guelph Radio, ON, Tuesdays 3pm EST)
www.umfm.com (Winnipeg’s Hit Free Radio, Fridays 6-6:30pm CST)
www.caperradio.com (Cape Breton University Radio, NS, Wednesdays 3-3:30pm AST)
www.localfm.ca (Campus Radio Saint John Inc., NB, Tuesdays 11:30am and Fridays 3:30pm AST)

Carnage; “I’m a 30 second kind of guy. In and out, in and out and I’m gone”

carnage dj

Most people may recognise Carnage for his recent contribution to the trap movement. Remember the London and Rocky track ‘Big Spender’? Yep, Carnage at the helm of that one. But take a closer look and you’ll soon see that he ain’t gonna be trapped by any genre confine. After his twitter announcement (small rant) advocating originality where ‘only the talented survive’, it’s clear he never had any intention of keeping all his eggs in one basket. After chatting with him and following his work, it’s apparent that his idea of talent lies in musical exploration. He’s declared an affinity for house, trance and many more branches of the EDM family tree, and he’s followed through.

If you missed this multifaceted DJ on his trip to Aus, his radio show ‘Incredible’ will showcase his everlasting effort to create, and then outrun, the ‘hype’. Carnage says the show is “a place where I can do whatever I want.” It’s fair to say that the internet has become a huge platform for public expression and to an equal extent, sharing. In our interview Carnage admitted that his love of music ignited when he started downloading pirated music at age 12. While piracy has a love/hate status in the industry, we all have to admit that it’s provided the means for everyone to have a vastly expansive and well-rounded appreciation of music. Much like Carnage. When asked if this accessibility helped shape is artistry Carnage said, “It totally has. I like a lot of different things. So with the process of making music, it’s like a platform for people to be creative where you think of different types of music, different types of sounds, arrangements, structures [etc].”

But of course, music isn’t the only thing we are sharing. In a recent twitter post Carnage posted about people not getting him, being done with the bullshit and that everyone can enjoy the same old shit. So what happened here? He had this to say on the topic: “I feel like people feel an obligation to be so judgmental just so they can look cool. Social media nowadays… People on Facebook just talk shit just so they can be the guy that trolls the DJ that everyone has been liking. Just like on Soundcloud when people post shit just so other people can see it and agree with them. And it’s kind of sad you know, because a lot of these artists work on these records a lot and I know the things that people say really bother them. They work on these things for days and weeks at a time and then people try to downplay it and it just sucks. If you don’t like the music these people are playing then how do you see the updates? You must follow them. People just want to give something different and others get mad over it, it’s like people just want the same fucking pretzel everyday.”Word, Carnage. And with a meal like that setting the benchmark, what an average world it would be. We’ve entered an oppourtunistic era where music can be shared with the press of a button and then to a larger extent, live on stage. Without this generation of interest, many artists we see wouldn’t be given the chance to tour.

Carnage told us how excited he was to be part of Future Music this year. But with any festival, there are always ups and downs “The best [part] is the loud, loud music and the worst is the Porta-potti’s.” (Porta-loo’s for us Aussie’s, a translation that Carnage found hilarious) And they do suck! Definitely a place you don’t want to find yourself in the later hours of a festival. “And what if you want to go hook-up?” Carnage raised his concern. “You’ve got nowhere to go you have to pick a porta-loo. Have you ever hooked up in a porta-loo?” Well, personally, it’s not a place where I would like to spend a lot of time. Even less so when it comes to romance. But Carnage never shy’s away from an oppourtunity “I’m a 30 second kind of guy. In and out, in and out and I’m gone.” Every artist has an element whether it’s smaller gigs, festivals or in the studio. But for Carnage it’s “in the porta-loo.”  (Hopefully someone caught him in his element!)

When searching for inspiration for his upcoming sets, Carnage isn’t a big planner. In fact, he lets out that it’s all about what he’s had to eat. For our Australian shows, he said he was not up for any Nutella (really!?) so you can definitely screw those lids back on the jars of Vegemite. However, the ingenious combination of Tim Tam’s and hot milk was enticing enough for Carnage to embrace (especially when fashioned as a straw). If you’re lost here, stop reading this instant and ask the closest Australian to you about what we are saying. Life. Changing. We know it and now, Carnage does too. If you get the chance to catch a live set in future, he offered these words for preparation- “I like to see a lot of beautiful women get naked during my sets. It’s awesome.”

But in most venues, probably not reccomended…